US-pilot offers four-day specialist helicopter flight training

Ten helicopter pilots from Namibia took part in a specialist helicopter flight training course in Swakopmund this week. The course was presented by chief pilot Simon Jones from Los Angeles, California, a helicopter pilot specialising in the flight of Robinson helicopters.
The course was organized by NAMAGRI Aviation Services, who is the leading distributor of Robinson helicopters in Namibia. The Robinson R44 is a four-seater light helicopter produced by the Robinson Helicopter Company. It remains the world’s best-selling general aviation (GA) helicopter since 1999.
“The R44 is very popular in Namibia and is used especially by farm or lodge owners in the game market,” explained NAMAGRI Managing Director, Alex McDonald to namib times. As these helicopters can fly at low altitudes and maintain great speed it is suitable for game counts or other low-altitude, high speed aerial operations.
Low altitude flying has one distinct disadvantage. In the event of a malfunction of the aircraft, there is little time for the pilot to react to avert an air accident.
“When doing a game census or similar, the pilots have little time to react should any emergency occur”, explained McDonald. Hence, the specialist training.
“It is for this reason we are offer pilots flying the R44 this specialized training”. According to McDonald pilots are drilled with procedures and appropriate actions in the event of emergencies. These include emergencies such as engine failure.
Jones is highly skilled and experienced with more than 14 000 helicopter flying hours.
According to McDonald the course contains very little theoretical work. Practical experience in different flight scenarios is paramount. Pilots accumulate a lot of practical knowledge through these exercises.
The training was offered over a four-day period and concluded yesterday.
Caption:
Two Robinson R44’s at the Swakopmund aerodrome. Ten pilots from all over Namibia received specialist training this week which was offered by chief pilot Simon Jones from the USA.

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